• Hey Guest! As we are sure you are aware, Russia has invaded Ukraine. Check out our pinned thread in the Roost for resources on how to support Ukraine in their ongoing crisis. Let's show our solidarity with the Ukrainian people!


StarTopic Books |ST| Now You're Reading with POWER

OP
OP
1upmuffin

1upmuffin

Sand Pounder
Community Liaison
So I've decided to give audiobooks another try, did an audible trial to get some free credits, and started listening to the first Wheel of Time book, The Eye of the World. I really really enjoy it so far. The characters are memorable, the pace is slow but not in a bad way, and it's overall intriguing so far. It's nice to listen to a really long book during the ~4 hours a week I drive, means I'll get through the book at a steady pace.

Also reading Player Piano still, about a 3rd done it.
 

Supreme Overlord

Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!
Pronouns
he/him
I've been falling way behind on my reading for the past while, so this thread is probably going to be dangerous for me. There's already so much that needs read even without the possibility of discovering more here.

Right now I'm reading Roadside Picnic in preparation of Waypoint Plus' STALKER 101 this month, and after that I'll be starting The Only Good Indians to kick off my #spooktober reads. I've also been reading Romance of the Three Kingdoms, 12 chapters at a time since March, fantastic book.
As Roadside Picnic is a rather quick read, and you posted this back in early October, you've probably finished the book. I recall enjoying it quite a bit. It's a fascinating little story.
Romance of the Three Kingdoms is one I picked up at a point when I couldn't really take the time to work through the whole thing. It's a different sort of tome from what one might often find in these sorts of discussions, and I really need to pick it back up. I really liked what I was able to read of it.

Currently reading through variations of Bram Stoker’s Dracula (my October/Halloween ritual).
We're certainly some ways past October by now, but what sorts of variations on Dracula were on this list? Any particularly standout adaptations?

Currently I am reading The Gospel According to Jesus Christ by José Saramago. It's a retelling of Jesus' life that changes several things and is very introspective. It's not a religious book (in fact it caused Saramago to be exiled by the Church) but instead just a good story of someone finding their way in the world.
Curiously, this brings to mind certain elements of Mikhail Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita. Have you had the pleasure of reading this story?

Sixteen Ways to Defend a Walled City, by K. J. Parker - amazing low fantasy (fake medieval?) book about skullduggery and civil engineering. Super bleak subject matter but uniformly hilarious.
On the subject of my slacking behind with reading, I picked this up a while back and it has since sat on my shelf waiting for me to get to it. I should rectify that.
A Desolation Called Peace - Arkady Martine
Also both this and its predecessor, A Memory Called Empire. It's probably about time I castigate myself for this gross negligence.
 

Shroomy

The Terror that Sucks in the Night: Poyo Duck!
Pronouns
She/Her
I've been falling way behind on my reading for the past while, so this thread is probably going to be dangerous for me. There's already so much that needs read even without the possibility of discovering more here.


As Roadside Picnic is a rather quick read, and you posted this back in early October, you've probably finished the book. I recall enjoying it quite a bit. It's a fascinating little story.
Romance of the Three Kingdoms is one I picked up at a point when I couldn't really take the time to work through the whole thing. It's a different sort of tome from what one might often find in these sorts of discussions, and I really need to pick it back up. I really liked what I was able to read of it.


We're certainly some ways past October by now, but what sorts of variations on Dracula were on this list? Any particularly standout adaptations?


Curiously, this brings to mind certain elements of Mikhail Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita. Have you had the pleasure of reading this story?


On the subject of my slacking behind with reading, I picked this up a while back and it has since sat on my shelf waiting for me to get to it. I should rectify that.

Also both this and its predecessor, A Memory Called Empire. It's probably about time I castigate myself for this gross negligence.

I read the original by Bram Stoker but with added illustrations by Becky Cloonan. The artwork is gorgeous and adds to the whole experience. Then I read the Caldwell comicbook with my child so she could experience an abbreviated version of the story.

That’s about it. XD
 
OP
OP
1upmuffin

1upmuffin

Sand Pounder
Community Liaison
10.5 hours into the Eye of the World audiobook (out of 32 hours), really liking the start of this massive fantasy journey!
 

Shawndroid

Cappy
Pronouns
He/him
It was a delight to hear the acting of Felicia Day in her recording of her memoir, which is a fun ride. I'd recommend it to anyone who knows her from the Guild, Dr. Horrible, and Geek and Sundry. I guess if your following her for her TV stuff too, but I haven't seen most of those shows.

Apparently I got Murderbot Diaries 1, 2 and 4 on sale. Didn't realize 3 was skipped on Downpour. How much should I go to get 3 before 4? 2 seems to follow very directly off 1, so I feel like I shouldn't wait until next year to pick up 3...
 
OP
OP
1upmuffin

1upmuffin

Sand Pounder
Community Liaison
Finished with Player Piano, wouldn't recommend it as your fist Vonnegut cause it's much weaker than the others I've read.
 
OP
OP
1upmuffin

1upmuffin

Sand Pounder
Community Liaison
Which one would you recommend to read first?

At r/books, they suggested to me to start with Slaughterhouse-Five, a book that I strongly disliked. But then some people said that Cat's Cradle it is a better book to start. Unfortunately, it is too late for me, I probably will not read another book of him anytime soon.

I'll be honest I didn't love Slaughterhouse Five either, so maybe you'll trust my opinion a bit more (I do think I owe it a second chance now though). My favorite book of his of the 4 I've read is Sirens of Titan, it's funny and poignant in a way that reminded me a bit of Terry Pratchett. It's around 200 pages and a super fast read, give it a chance.
 

chrkrhc

that disappearing horizon
Pronouns
he/him
She Who Became the Sun, by Shelley Parker-Chan - awesome debut novel, historical (14th century) fantasy about an orphaned peasant girl who becomes emperor, with a lot of starvation and scheming and bloodshed and ghosts and battles and stuff along the way. Book has a pretty slow start with the "I was born at a young age" structure that way too many first novels rely on, but reads great from the first page. Once you get about a fifth of the way through, our protagonist grows up and the book just absolutely blasts off.

Series alert: It's also part 1 of a planned duology, but this book definitely finishes super strong and tells a complete, satisfying story. I will be happy to read the next book if and when it gets published, but would also be fine if it turns out to be a one and done kind of thing.
 

Supreme Overlord

Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!
Pronouns
he/him
I read the original by Bram Stoker but with added illustrations by Becky Cloonan. The artwork is gorgeous and adds to the whole experience. Then I read the Caldwell comicbook with my child so she could experience an abbreviated version of the story.

That’s about it. XD
Ah, that sounds quite nice, actually, and reading with your kid is a sweet way to spend time together.

If you're interested in more Dracula, La Ruta del Hilo y la Sal is about his voyage to England. It was just published in English this year as The Route of Ice and Salt.

I wanna punch Konstantin Dmitrich Levin in Anna Karenina. He act as an adolescent! C'mon, be a man.
Just 300 pages to go. Probably will finish this weekend.
It's been absolute ages since I've read that, but I don't remember him being inherently punchable. What's going on with Kostya?
Might be due for a reread.

Finished with Player Piano, wouldn't recommend it as your fist Vonnegut cause it's much weaker than the others I've read.
It's interesting though, as, being Vonnegut's first novel, it displays the beginnings of what would become his style, unrefined.
Which might be a reason to read that one after others, as that element would more be able to be appreciated with later context.

She Who Became the Sun, by Shelley Parker-Chan - awesome debut novel, historical (14th century) fantasy about an orphaned peasant girl who becomes emperor, with a lot of starvation and scheming and bloodshed and ghosts and battles and stuff along the way. Book has a pretty slow start with the "I was born at a young age" structure that way too many first novels rely on, but reads great from the first page. Once you get about a fifth of the way through, our protagonist grows up and the book just absolutely blasts off.

Series alert: It's also part 1 of a planned duology, but this book definitely finishes super strong and tells a complete, satisfying story. I will be happy to read the next book if and when it gets published, but would also be fine if it turns out to be a one and done kind of thing.
Oh, I forgot this had released. It looked interesting.
I don't need to add more to my list; I don't need to add more to my list...
 

Shroomy

The Terror that Sucks in the Night: Poyo Duck!
Pronouns
She/Her
Ah, that sounds quite nice, actually, and reading with your kid is a sweet way to spend time together.

If you're interested in more Dracula, La Ruta del Hilo y la Sal is about his voyage to England. It was just published in English this year as The Route of Ice and Salt.


It's been absolute ages since I've read that, but I don't remember him being inherently punchable. What's going on with Kostya?
Might be due for a reread.


It's interesting though, as, being Vonnegut's first novel, it displays the beginnings of what would become his style, unrefined.
Which might be a reason to read that one after others, as that element would more be able to be appreciated with later context.


Oh, I forgot this had released. It looked interesting.
I don't need to add more to my list; I don't need to add more to my list...
Ooo, I’m always looking for more Dracula related things, so thank you! I will definitely look into it!
 

Supreme Overlord

Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!
Pronouns
he/him
Ooo, I’m always looking for more Dracula related things, so thank you! I will definitely look into it!
Glad to have added something of interest! The translation itself is published by Innsmouth Free Press -- which refers, of course, to the imposing shadow of Lovecraft -- which is connected to Silvia Moreno-Garcia, who people here might know from Certain Dark Things, Gods of Jade and Shadow or, perhaps most famously, Mexican Gothic.
 

SammyJ9

Weeb of the Rings
Pronouns
He/Him
10.5 hours into the Eye of the World audiobook (out of 32 hours), really liking the start of this massive fantasy journey!
Nice! Still enjoying it? I was a huge fan of Wheel of Time years ago (well, still am I guess, I just haven't read them in many years).

And hello all! I just discovered there was a book thread here! I mostly read SFF, but also love mystery too. Even better if it's SFF and mystery together!
 

KilgoreWolfe

wolfbear extroadinaire
Pronouns
He/him
Oh nice, a book ST! I keep track of everything I read on the Storygraph (it's like Goodreads but not owned by Amazon), so let me just drop that link here: https://app.thestorygraph.com/profile/kilgorewolfe

I'm open to a lot of different genres. Never been big on fantasy but there are some that I enjoy. Lately I've been reading a good amount of genre fiction, like the Newberry and Hobbes steampunk books by George Mann, and The Keeper of Night by Kylie Lee Baker, which is I guess historical fantasy.

I'm a big Stephen King fan as well, having read all of his books. Which is kinda funny as growing up I was very much a wimp about horror anything. I still am a little squeamish with some horror films but horror books? Love 'em. I think the scariest book I've ever read is The Only Good Indians by Stephen Graham Jones. That one left me with a constant feeling of dread as I was reading, fantastic stuff.

I also joined the Book of the Month club about two years ago or so, which has been great for expanding my reading horizons, even if I sometimes end up with a dud. If you're in the US and read a lot I'd recommend it, they usually have a pretty varied selection every month, although they tend to skew towards fiction over non-fiction.
 
OP
OP
1upmuffin

1upmuffin

Sand Pounder
Community Liaison
Nice! Still enjoying it? I was a huge fan of Wheel of Time years ago (well, still am I guess, I just haven't read them in many years).

And hello all! I just discovered there was a book thread here! I mostly read SFF, but also love mystery too. Even better if it's SFF and mystery together!

Yeah I really like it! Jordan creates a massive world and gives it space to breath, so I've not minded the length. Mat is awful in the first book though, just keep wanting to tell him to shut up.
 

SammyJ9

Weeb of the Rings
Pronouns
He/Him
Yeah I really like it! Jordan creates a massive world and gives it space to breath, so I've not minded the length. Mat is awful in the first book though, just keep wanting to tell him to shut up.
Mat kind of sucks for the first few books, but he REALLY grows and gets batter by book 3 or 4 and turns into a great character, just takes some time
 

KilgoreWolfe

wolfbear extroadinaire
Pronouns
He/him
Merry Christmas everyone! I got a good haul of books today:

Black Sun by Rebecca Roanhorse
The Sentence by Louise Erdrich
The Way of Kings by Brandon Sanderson
The City We Became by N.K Jemisin
The House in the Cerulean Sea by TJ Klune
Music Is History by Questlove
Final Fantasy Ultimania Archive Volume 2

Whew, that's a lot to add to my backlog, haha. Anyone else get some good books for Christmas? (if you celebrate, that is)
 

Supreme Overlord

Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!
Pronouns
he/him
Great book.

His mood changes all the time because of his love for Kitty (until the middle of the book). He doesn't look like a (rich) grown up man, instead, he seems like a spoiled adolescent.

At least he had some (silly) dignity to tell her that he was not virgin anymore before the marriage.
I think I do have some vague recollection of that, now that you mention it, not enough to have any lasting distaste toward the guy, nor to seem particularly egregious or unrealistic, but, again, it's been absolute ages and I might have a different response were I to return to it now.
But yes, good book.
Oh nice, a book ST! I keep track of everything I read on the Storygraph (it's like Goodreads but not owned by Amazon), so let me just drop that link here: https://app.thestorygraph.com/profile/kilgorewolfe

I'm open to a lot of different genres. Never been big on fantasy but there are some that I enjoy. Lately I've been reading a good amount of genre fiction, like the Newberry and Hobbes steampunk books by George Mann, and The Keeper of Night by Kylie Lee Baker, which is I guess historical fantasy.

I'm a big Stephen King fan as well, having read all of his books. Which is kinda funny as growing up I was very much a wimp about horror anything. I still am a little squeamish with some horror films but horror books? Love 'em. I think the scariest book I've ever read is The Only Good Indians by Stephen Graham Jones. That one left me with a constant feeling of dread as I was reading, fantastic stuff.

I also joined the Book of the Month club about two years ago or so, which has been great for expanding my reading horizons, even if I sometimes end up with a dud. If you're in the US and read a lot I'd recommend it, they usually have a pretty varied selection every month, although they tend to skew towards fiction over non-fiction.
I went to check out your Storygraph, but it indicated I needed to actually create an account to see it. Tricky Storygraph. I might bother to do that at some point.

Different genres are, after all, the spice of life. Given it's your specifically non-preferred genre, what is it you do appreciate in the fantasy that you actually enjoy?

Horror is a genre I didn't really get into way back when, mostly because it was one I didn't have a ton of access to. That said, I do appreciate a good horror -- or even just an interesting one. The Only Good Indians, and Stephen Graham Jones in general, has caught my eye for a while. I want to check it out after I clear out some of my other physically-present backlog.

(I meant to ask in that General Discussion book-related discussion, but I was wondering whether your moniker is a reference to Kilgore Trout.)

Merry Christmas everyone! I got a good haul of books today:

Black Sun by Rebecca Roanhorse
The Sentence by Louise Erdrich
The Way of Kings by Brandon Sanderson
The City We Became by N.K Jemisin
The House in the Cerulean Sea by TJ Klune
Music Is History by Questlove
Final Fantasy Ultimania Archive Volume 2

Whew, that's a lot to add to my backlog, haha. Anyone else get some good books for Christmas? (if you celebrate, that is)

That does look like a decent haul. From the titles I'm familiar with, that should be a fair variety.

I think this is the first year in quite some time I didn't get any books (though my sister says she has something on its way for me, and she did get me a book last year, so that might yet change). I'd say it's unfortunate, but I guess I am out of shelf space ...
 

KilgoreWolfe

wolfbear extroadinaire
Pronouns
He/him
I went to check out your Storygraph, but it indicated I needed to actually create an account to see it. Tricky Storygraph. I might bother to do that at some point.

Different genres are, after all, the spice of life. Given it's your specifically non-preferred genre, what is it you do appreciate in the fantasy that you actually enjoy?

Horror is a genre I didn't really get into way back when, mostly because it was one I didn't have a ton of access to. That said, I do appreciate a good horror -- or even just an interesting one. The Only Good Indians, and Stephen Graham Jones in general, has caught my eye for a while. I want to check it out after I clear out some of my other physically-present backlog.

(I meant to ask in that General Discussion book-related discussion, but I was wondering whether your moniker is a reference to Kilgore Trout.)



That does look like a decent haul. From the titles I'm familiar with, that should be a fair variety.

I think this is the first year in quite some time I didn't get any books (though my sister says she has something on its way for me, and she did get me a book last year, so that might yet change). I'd say it's unfortunate, but I guess I am out of shelf space ...
I mainly jumped on Storygraph to try and limit my use of Amazon owned services like Goodreads, and I was even able to import all my Goodreads info so that was nice. I don't really interact with it much beyond keeping track of what I've read.

As for the things I enjoy in fantasy, I'm honestly not great at articulating what it is I like about the things that I like, so it'd probably be easier to list some of the fantasy I do enjoy:

A Song of Ice and Fire
The Kingkiller Chronicles by Patrick Rothefuss
I suppose The Dark Tower books by Stephen King are arguably fantasy too.
I liked the first two books of the Draconis Memoria series by Anthony Ryan too (haven't managed to track down the third book yet).
There are some more that I can't quite think of at the moment, but that's a rough idea of my tastes on fantasy.

I honestly can't recommend The Only Good Indians enough, it's so good. And all of the other Stephen Graham Jones books I've read have been fantastic too, so I very highly recommend him as an author.

(It is a reference to Kilgore Trout and you're the first person to pick up on that like... ever. I'm genuinely happy someone finally did.)

I can definitely relate to running out of bookshelf space, haha. I have four bookshelves that are pretty much all overflowing. I wouldn't mind getting another but I'm not sure where I'd put it at this point.
 

KilgoreWolfe

wolfbear extroadinaire
Pronouns
He/him
Happy 2022! Anyone have a reading goal for this year?
Happy New Year! I don't really have a goal this year, other than "don't waste time trying to force myself through books I'm obviously not enjoying," which is an issue I've had in the past that's slowed my reading to a crawl.
 

Supreme Overlord

Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!
Pronouns
he/him
A happy new year to all the book readers on this site; may we all discover and read myriad good material.

(It is a reference to Kilgore Trout and you're the first person to pick up on that like... ever. I'm genuinely happy someone finally did.)
I'm glad to have helped that day finally arrive!
 

Schiaffino

Lurker
Happy 2022! Anyone have a reading goal for this year?
I’ve had 25 books as a goal the last two years, that’s a realistic estimate for me. The backlog is full, looking forward to it. Reading Dune atm, the movie was fantastic so time for a re-read.
 

Derachi

Fresh Eater
Founder
Pronouns
he/him
FamiGold
51
Happy 2022! Anyone have a reading goal for this year?
I haven't read much (besides comics/manga) since finishing High School over a decade ago but one of my 2022 Resolutions is to read actual books more! I got Hideo Kojima's book The Creative Gene for Christmas from my girlfriend's mom and that's been, frankly, great at getting me to want to read more. It (at least the first half of the book) is a collection of Kojima's essays written for Da Vinci Magazine in which he talks about his own love of reading and recounts and discusses his favourite books. It has already got me to start a (increasingly expensive lmao) "to-read" list.
 
OP
OP
1upmuffin

1upmuffin

Sand Pounder
Community Liaison
I haven't read much (besides comics/manga) since finishing High School over a decade ago but one of my 2022 Resolutions is to read actual books more! I got Hideo Kojima's book The Creative Gene for Christmas from my girlfriend's mom and that's been, frankly, great at getting me to want to read more. It (at least the first half of the book) is a collection of Kojima's essays written for Da Vinci Magazine in which he talks about his own love of reading and recounts and discusses his favourite books. It has already got me to start a (increasingly expensive lmao) "to-read" list.
Always remember your local library! Does not have to be an expensive hobby.
 

AndroidOS

Cappy
Got a few books for Christmas that I’m looking forward to reading! I’ve just finished both A Deadly Education and The Last Graduate by Naomi Novik - I found A Deadly Education was difficult to start/get into, but once it did I was hooked. Looking forward to the next entry in the series.

I’ve got the new Jack Reacher book to start next, and then I think I’m going to go onto the new Ian Rankin/William McIlvanney book. After that I’ll go back to slowly re-reading the Wheel of Time series, which I got back into after watching the TV series.
 

Supreme Overlord

Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!
Pronouns
he/him
Happy 2022! Anyone have a reading goal for this year?
Goal: Read, um, more than I have recently. Maybe I can make that a bit more specific, something along the lines of at least reading through my immediate Read-List ... which isn't actually codified.

Got a few books for Christmas that I’m looking forward to reading! I’ve just finished both A Deadly Education and The Last Graduate by Naomi Novik - I found A Deadly Education was difficult to start/get into, but once it did I was hooked. Looking forward to the next entry in the series.
What did you find initially difficult about getting into that one? It sounds like a good start to the year, regardless. I haven't read those, but I really enjoyed Novik's Spinning Silver.
 

KilgoreWolfe

wolfbear extroadinaire
Pronouns
He/him
So I've started and finished a book already this year: Black Sun by Rebecca Roanhorse.

It's Epic fantasy inspired by the mythology and culture of pre-Columbian indigenous Americans, and it's so good. The world-building is great without dragging the story down, and the characters are all very interesting. I'm very excited for the sequel, whenever that comes out
 

Shawndroid

Cappy
Pronouns
He/him
I started 'Meteors and Menorahs' by Nessa Claugh. It's a funny, light-hearted, story about a woman who brings a colleague home to pretend to be her boyfriend... who turns out to be an alien collected physiological information about humans to inform the decision to initiate first contact.

Knar has been studying the physiology of humans for years in preparation to introduce Earth to the rest of the galaxy and present them as a species that can adapt to change well. Although he believes in his mission, he’s also had his eye on his coworker Leah, and her invitation to come home with her for the holidays is just the opportunity he’s been looking for.

Going home for Hanukkah is normally the least of Leah’s worries until her mom lets it slip that her dad invited her ex-boyfriend. Desperate to keep him at arm’s length, Leah invites her handsome coworker Kenneth Knar to be a buffer against her family. Having to pretend he’s her new boyfriend doesn’t hurt, and if it annoys her parents, all the better.

He just has to find some way to tell her that he’s more than just a gentile. He’s not even from this planet. And Leah hates liars.
I'm enjoying it. I'm starting to enjoy low stakes, slice of life sci-fi like Becky Chamber's work. Also, I've been enjoying funny stuff, like Magic 2.0 and Galaxy Outlaws etc. And this is a bit of both.




 

randomengine

Shriekbat
Banned
Pronouns
He/Him
I am currently building a home library which is taking over my living room. I have over 700 catalogued books - sorted by LCC (Library of Congress Classification).

Of those 700, over 100 of them are Library of America volumes. Library of America is a non-profit publisher that began in the early 80s from funding from endowments and grants. Their mission is to keep the greatest American writing in print in cost-effective, but well-designed and well-constructed volumes. What I truly love about the LoA is that they embody the spirit of inclusivity and publish the broad spectrum of great American writing - from wood-cut graphic novels to plays and poetry to stories by Lovecraft and Philip K Dick. Their volumes are considered the definitive edition of just about every story they publish.

My subscription is on an about once-a-month cadence. My previous volume was the 2nd volume in their American Science Fiction of the 1960s series, which is in fact their 4th volume on anthologized science fiction (they also have a two-part series on the 1950s). So now I have 4 volumes of Science Fiction from the 1950s-1960s that I am eager to bite into.

The latest volume that they have sent me is the second volume on American Speeches. Which goes from Abraham Lincoln to Bill Clinton. They had originally sent me the first volume of that series - Revolutionary times to the Civil War near the beginning of my LoA subscription journey, so I waited a long time to complete the set and I had to chuckle when I saw that the volume they sent me was a 1st edition - meaning they still have a mountain of these things to give away.

I have a spreadsheet to keep track of the whole thing - they have 359 volumes in the series - not counting their special publications - so I still have only 31.39% of the series. Their current publishing schedule suggests I will never catch up or will do so very slowly. Oddly, the only volume I have from their 2021 books is the recent Ray Bradbury volume which I thought was extremely generous of them to put on my subscription seeing as how popular that one would be. I was very pleased with whomever made that decision.

As for my current reading - I always have my finger in about 1000 pies, but my most recent obsession is a novel called Mordew by Alex Pheby. I was struck by the cover art at Barnes and Noble and knew exactly nothing about it. After reading the inside flap, I was drawn to it's ultra grim-dark narrative and aesthetic. It is very imaginative and original and I am really digging the way it reads. It's a child protagonist story that reads like it is written for adults. It appears to be the beginning of a trilogy and I have no doubts that I will get the other two novels whenever they are published. I love discovering these hidden gems that nobody is talking about.

Here is an excerpt from a review of the book from The Guardian....

"Vast numbers of such novels are in print today. I’m one of the judges for the 2020 World Fantasy award and over the last few months I’ve read literally hundreds of fantasy titles, some good, some bad, most mediocre. I might easily have groaned at yet another entry into this overcrowded mode. But Mordew is a darkly brilliant novel, extraordinary, absorbing and dream-haunting. That it succeeds as well as it does speaks to Pheby’s determination not to passively inhabit his Gormenghastly idiom but instead to lead it to its most extreme iteration, to force inventiveness and grotesqueness into every crevice of his work. It seems that one way to take an apparently exhausted idiom and make it new is just to push through, with enough imaginative energy to refresh the tired old tropes. Mordew is so crammed with grotesque inventiveness that it overwhelms the reader’s resistance."

GBP_PHEBY_Mordew_Cover_HDBK_v3.jpg



Here is the inside flap text that drew my attention:

"God is dead, his corpse hidden in the catacombs beneath Mordew.

In the slums of the sea-battered city, a young boy called Nathan Treeves lives with his parents, eking out a meagre existence by picking treasures from the Living Mud and the half-formed, short-lived creatures it spawns. Until one day his desperate mother sells him to the mysterious Master of Mordew.

The Master derives his magical power from feeding on the corpse of God. But Nathan, despite his fear and lowly station, has his own strength—and it is greater than the Master has ever known. Great enough to destroy everything the Master has built. If only Nathan can discover how to use it.

So it is that the Master begins to scheme against him—and Nathan has to fight his way through the betrayals, secrets, and vendettas of the city where God was murdered, and darkness reigns."
 
Last edited:
D

Deleted member 1869

Guest
I am currently building a home library which is taking over my living room. I have over 700 catalogued books - sorted by LCC (Library of Congress Classification).
That's impressive.

Do you put stickers on them too?
 

randomengine

Shriekbat
Banned
Pronouns
He/Him
That's impressive.

Do you put stickers on them too?
Nah. I want to keep them nice, plus I have seen it done before on used books and it just feels a bit tacky to me. I buy a lot of used books and I've read quite a few messages written in the book from one loved-one to another and it breaks my heart that people just give them away instead of trying to find a way to keep them.

Maybe if my collection gets large enough I might reconsider, but currently nope.
 

Harina

burn me at the stake
Moderator
Pronouns
she/her
@Vanillalite to answer your question in that other thread, my godkid is obsessed with the Diary of a Wimpy Kid series. It's even got a movie coming.
 

Phosphorescent Skeleton

It feels like I'm in a fairytale
Pronouns
She/Her
Almost done reading the Thomas Knockers by S. King. Been trying to read through all of his books for reasons I can neither explain or defend. I wish I could say this is the worst one so far, but sadly there are much worse.
 

merp

Chain Chomp
Pronouns
He/him
I'm thinking about doing an A Song of Ice and Fire re-read (I know, it's kinda passé at this point since every ASOIAF fan seems to do it).

I plan to take notes over time.

The primary characters that I plan to take notes on are:

Davos Seaworth

Sansa Stark

Jon Connington

Daenerys Targaryen

Stannis Baratheon

Aeron Greyjoy

(Basically all my favorite characters.)

The secondary characters that I plan to take notes on are:


Victarion Greyjoy

Theon Greyjoy

Euron Greyjoy

Asha Greyjoy

Young Griff

Rickon Stark

Mance Rayder

Arianne Martell

......

Anyone else I should focus on? I'm trying to focus on a select few rather than everything at once.
 

Supreme Overlord

Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!
Pronouns
he/him
I'm thinking about doing an A Song of Ice and Fire re-read (I know, it's kinda passé at this point since every ASOIAF fan seems to do it).

I plan to take notes over time.

The primary characters that I plan to take notes on are:

Davos Seaworth

Sansa Stark

Jon Connington

Daenerys Targaryen

Stannis Baratheon

Aeron Greyjoy

(Basically all my favorite characters.)

The secondary characters that I plan to take notes on are:

Victarion Greyjoy

Theon Greyjoy

Euron Greyjoy

Asha Greyjoy

Young Griff

Rickon Stark

Mance Rayder

Arianne Martell

......

Anyone else I should focus on? I'm trying to focus on a select few rather than everything at once.
What do you think I should do or look out for?

I'm not going to be any actual help here since I haven't read that particular series, but I like the idea here. It might help people make suggestions if the methodology is explained a bit. What sorts of notes are you planning on taking?
 

merp

Chain Chomp
Pronouns
He/him
I'm not going to be any actual help here since I haven't read that particular series, but I like the idea here. It might help people make suggestions if the methodology is explained a bit. What sorts of notes are you planning on taking?
Actually, I'm not sure how I'll do it, but I don't want to focus on "anything and everything," just the stuff I'm interested in.

I think that I'll have a PDF open and a document open in another tab. I basically want to list all the information given about them and their backstories and leave comments as well. I'm... not sure how else I can improvise though. I haven't really done this thing before.
 
OP
OP
1upmuffin

1upmuffin

Sand Pounder
Community Liaison
Started The Horse and His Boy, only a few more Narnia books left. This one is pretty racist, ngl.
 

merp

Chain Chomp
Pronouns
He/him
Started The Horse and His Boy, only a few more Narnia books left. This one is pretty racist, ngl.
I'll say this:

At least you know what to expect with people like H.P. Lovecraft.

Narnia kinda blindsides you in this department, though Lovecraft's writings are still the worse, from what I know (never read beyond the third book of Narnia).
 


Top Bottom